click to show more information

click to hide/show information About your Search

20121224
20130101
STATION
CSPAN2 21
LANGUAGE
English 21
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21
, speeches, which constit--constitute strong policy documents on the economy, on foreign policy, during the presidency, before the presidency and during the 1980 presidential campaign. some of that's in the book as well. c-span: by the way, i have one question. it does--you didn't cover it in any of the intros or anything. where are the tapes of the radio addresses? >> guest: that's a great question, and we have the tape here today. they're at the hoover institution archives. and this project could not have happened without both archives. the radio broadcasts, the handwritten versions, and all of the private papers are at the reagan library, although they are not controlled by the library. there's not a deed of gift. they are controlled by the reagans. they're private papers that happen to be housed there. so that's one place where reagan material is. the second place is the hoover institution, which controls the tapes. it was able to get hold of the tapes. harry o'connor was the producer of reagan's radio broadcasts. in fact, he was in hollywood at the time, in the '70s, and suggested
about this. has the american foreign policy changed all since the cold war ended? >> it's been over for more than 20 years now. and is the u.s. still seemed to be cracked open? >> i want to hear you talk about it because -- >> i'm not a historian to be i cannot this from the outside that it's such a heartbreaker. there is a season of peace in the late 80's with reagan and the garbage of reaching some agreement on the nuclear arms and then when push comes into office in january of course dukakis was my choice and he was leading in the race but the it as it may she has a golden opportunity. truman -- truly stalin moment. gorbachev is offering as you said an oyster so the typical of the troops on a figure up and they can have their germany as long as nato doesn't go further. these kind of things are in the air and what does bush to? trademark and square happens and he suspends relations but behind the scenes to beat he does business as usual. he goes into panama in december of '89. i will never forget that because fourth of july was opening on that same day and the american people love
in. and i do what i am interested in. says history have any place of foreign policy? of course. this semester we do elegy bt rights, education, and students read material from all sides of the issues. >>host: day ms washington? >> nine this the of little bit of power because the matter how small the agency or miniscule the power when people have problems problems, sometimes you can help them. with the commission imus being able to bring people that no one heard from war would be listened to. >> this is your third or fourth book? >>guest: no. have written many more. maybe nine or 10. i am working on one right now. the topic is what does that mean, it is on voter fraud. i found a place in louisiana where they seem to have a persistent record of voter fraud from the 19th century until now. i was given records that nobody else has. so if you want to see voter suppression here it is. >> when we you see that? >> what about the term post racial? >> they are an idiot. there is a big debate about this when obama was selected by the democrats but we are beyond thinking about issues of ra
addition what foreign policy do you think you should have? what would you do? >> with compassion and a love of mankind with the global purpose. the century of the common man seems to be paramount because we have more knowledge. the world can cooperate and i think globalization is not us with the bigger shirk but cooperating. that is the century i want to live bin. >> 300 people have more wealth than 300 million and the wal-mart shares are richest and the top 1 percent have more wealth than the bottom 90 percent we need to redistribute resources. >> they say you cannot live like that. there is always the bad guy. now is the chinese. it is an old argument we become the bad guy because nobody yaks worse than we do. >> we have the power and ironically it was our space that now devolves into the space electronic shield, a triple canopy by 2025, we could become a fascist force for control. we are. like "star wars" and george lucas. will we follow our heart or follow the base instincts? >> host: think you. >> host: john jackson, jr. professor of africana studies at it ever since pennsylvania and a
things that happens while kennedy is alive that has a very important impact on foreign policy is the assassination of the president of south vietnam. our client, our ally over there. and then two weeks later, i think it's two weeks later, kennedy is himself assassinated. and as you were saying before, this raised the questions that historians can argue about, keep arguing about, the next 50 years, would kennedy have wanted to -- would he have pulled american troops out of vietnam dish pull adviseers out, and you -- indications are that he would have and you cite various sources.that. just curious, just to challenge that a little bit, there's a wonderful book by a diploma called, "choosing war" in which he says that viet cong attacks were doubling in november from the month above in south vietnam. and that there were meetings of kennedy's top advicers in honolulu, which is -- which i think finished up the day before kennedy was assassinated -- a great film -- and they warn the viet cong is going to win if the u.s. didn't do something very quickly. so, not to challenge the memor
out. >> ambassador eizenstat come israel is one of the few foreign-policy issues in the 2012 campaign. mitt romney saying he a sinuous anti-semite between the u.s. and israel. is the u.s. relationship and vice versa a healthy relationship? >> it is a remarkable relationship between one of the nations that have the smallest majority in israel had our great country. it's almost a mystical relationship when he think of how much support we have showered on israel and how much support we get back. it is due to the fact that this is not just a jewish support. barely 2% of the population united states. it is because we have shared values, shared enemies and islamic terrorism that many people in the united states viewed israel as the holy land. not just jews, but not jews as well. it's a remarkable time when there's so much polarization between republicans and democrats. it's one of the few foreign-policy issues that actually unite democrats and republicans. >> "the future of the jews." is your book title provocative in any way and do you mean it to be? >> i mean it to be because 10 people wh
the preoccupation of the committee and a preoccupation of the foreign policy and those concerned with foreign policy nationwide. why now? partly because this time we lost an ambassador and a great man. but mostly, it's because now benghazi isn't just a loss of diplomats, we have lost some before, but now there is a partisan advantage to be sought by one side or the other . this incident was an important, but is it more important than the north korean nuclear program? is it more important than the other subjects that haven't been the subject of so many hearings of this committee? we have now decided to focus on the politics security in part because we can blame one party or the other. we can blame the state department for not allocating its resources to diplomatic security or blame the republican congress for not appropriating the enough. we should do more for diplomatic security. this department should follow its own procedures, and we have not done so. we would like to believe in the world that is subject somehow to our control, that if we just do the right thing everything will turn out right. thi
to be a foreign policy, naming a policy for him to the world's great deliberative body. >> you actually think that people are granted 2010 it got elected or the people ran before and it now ascended to positions of leadership believes that go with a solution or they were like that to not do things i supposed to do things? >> well, again, from a class of 2010 and our effort to the the 87 freshman, the so-called tea party class of the 112 congress, their belief is they are doing precisely what the people who elected them did, which is rolled back obama initiatives, cut spending. a lot that the debt ceiling should not be increased under a circumstances where they feel like i was a failure. but they basically believe their job is first to obstruct barack obama and once there is a republican president in place to pass this initiatives that create better business climate. more and more deregulation committee funding of programs that have never quite been near and dear to them. i think they do believe -- of course to fast-forward a bit about the debt ceiling fiasco of 2011, but after the summer we w
summers and peter norris said. of the foreign policy team, robert gates up to his eyeballs most of the bad things the country has done for decades. >> but he promised he would pull troops out of iraq so he falls through on his promise. >> so they do not take it seriously enough. we think it has been a big mistake. one thing he said is that cut back on the bush secrecy and has not followed through. with the espionage act was passed three people were indicted we were critical of many things but with the treatment of bradley manning it was very problematic but in some ways with bush and cheney for the war crimes committed so if you commit war crimes you walk free? if you expose then you are sentenced to jail? his policy is problematic. and with the case like yemen and then if it backfires the times square bombers. >> we have one minute left. >> not only as factual but what form policy should we have? what would you do? >> impassioned and a love of mankind and a purpose a century of the common man because the world can cooperate and has as a bigger shark but cooperating. >> if we have the rich
what is your source of power? after all she doesn't have any foreign-policy experience but she attends national security council meetings. she's often in the most important domestic meetings regarding the economy. no one gets to see the president without first going through valerie jarrett so what is this power that she has. the only explanation i can come up with after all these interviews i did was that she had given the first lady first lady and the president the impression that she had there back and she is protecting them from a hostile world if you will, a world in which people could come to see the president and make proposals that would not be to their liking. so for instance, when as an example, when the president wanted to do a mandate requiring religious institutions to provide free medical care, i'm sorry, health insurance for abortions and contraception, bill daily who was then the chief of staff, brad archbishop dolan from new york, the catholic archbishop who is now cardinal dolan, to speak to the president. valerie was obviously posted this mandate. when valerie jarrett
source of power? she doesn't have any foreign policy experience but she attends national security council meetings. she doesn't have any economic background but she is often in the most important domestic meetings regarding the economy. no one gets to see the president without going through valerie jarrett. what is this power she has? the only explanation i could come up with after all these interviews i did was that she has given the first lady and the president the impression that she has bareback, she is protecting them from a hostile world, if you will, all world in which people could come to see the president and make proposals that would not be to his liking. for instance, when as an example when the president wanted to do a mandate requiring religious institutions to provide free medical care, free health insurance for abortions and contraception, bill daley, the then chief of staff brought archbishop bowlen from new york, the catholic archbishop who is now cardinal to speak to the president. when valerie because she was obviously opposed to this mandate as a catholic, when valerie
, these nonfiction titles were included in the foreign policy magazines must read books.
republican president of the united states. the league well within the mainstream of american foreign policy. the senate has to ratify it. it and 80 of them have said that they want the united states to ratify the treaty and join the league of nations under some conditions. 80 is well more than enough to make ratifications. >> they need two-thirds. >> 64 or -- ratification is not hard in the scenario. you have 80. you need 64 or 65. okay. the deal baker. they shouldn't be deal breaker. very few people view them as deal breaker. he knows wilson. and lodge says wilson, you know, he might accept reservation on the principle. we can get the ratification easily if you accept it. and wilson says i will never except the reservations. lodge at the reds elevation of the treaty. lodge is the republican. >> from the other party. >> that's right he's the republican the leader of the republican party in the senate. the most influential voice. >> the partisan break down. >> it's pretty closely split. there's a democratic i believe there's a democratic majority at this point. the key is 50eu6. it you canno
several nonfiction titles included in foreign policy magazine must read books. >> booktv is here at the annual national press club authors night and joining us now is author r. renshaw agree who has written a book called first cameraman. what is with the obama administration. >> is a videographer, sent in a carriage for a few years in the white house. the lifecycle did not work on the campaign formally or the white house power to the new and strange world of super pacs and independent expenditures. spectaculars about the campaign into destiny. as you get hooked up in a president? >> it is the right place, right time. a friend of mine was working at cnn as a documentary producer and has a more normal path into politics. i was not the first on anyone's list. she would knew i wanted to get involved in broadband and then i just hit it off with the senator and started traveling inside the bubble. >> how long did you do it? was a 24/7 for a while? >> you know, especially on the campaign, it really felt like 20 for seven. i was practically living in chicago when i was there too were thr
are making on the vigor transforming the role of the day so very unfortunate results. you talk about foreign policy as being at least two ideas or and although she's in play and i would be interested -- i keep on thinking that you are a vietnam analogy by and we must stand tough but you wouldn't subscribe to that. >> it's a special representation in the first place which dominates the rest of the book and in vietnam i think you have to take them both together. you cannot be in munich or vietnam. munich is an ethnology that tends to thrive when the country has been in peace and prosperity for long enough it feels it can do anything. it feels it can intervene on behalf of subject and oppressed people around the world and it doesn't think about the cost it hasn't had to pay the cost for several decades now. vietnam is about taking care of one's own the and paying attention to how things can go wrong despite the best of intentions. if he were a total vietnam person you will be such a realist that would be crude you wouldn't have anything on the interest and to the nation requires ideals for the
or joint chiefs. >> and then had the generals a pressing him on afghanistan. >> has the foreign policy change? and has been more than 20 years. and does the u.s. still see the world doesn't oyster to be cracked open? >> you and your own question. [laughter] i want to hear you and towel 9/11. >> i am not a historian. it is a heartbreaker. there was a season of peace with the reagan and gorbachev with nuclear arms then bush comes into office and of course, dukakis was my choice is a trumans stalin moment. going into eastern europe to let nato take over germany these things are in the air. bush? >> host: square. he does business as usual with china and goes into panama december 1989. the american people loved it it was our backyard. me noriega was the news dahlin. and that is another untold story. and with the doctor of the photos it breaks my heart personally send a the veteran we don't take advantage of the possibilities with the soviet union reprivatize with russia and then 43, and it is natalie squandered but it is heartbreaking during that period. >> it is a lost opportunity. i agree
journal." a look at the biggest foreign policy events of 2012, our guest is ely lake of news week and the daily beast. then the biggest political stories of 2012. we'll look at that with juan williams. "washington journal" starts every morning at 7 eastern on c-span. >> as we wait for this pro forma session to get under way, some information about programming happening the day after christmas. c-span spoke with two retiring lawmakers, congressman dan burton and senator kent conrad. mr. burton, an indiana republican, served in congress for 30 years, and in the 1990s chaired the house oversight committee. senator conrad, the north dakota democrat, has been in office for 20 years and chairs the senate budget committee. our interview with congressman burton is at 8 p.m. wednesday night and senator conrad follows at 8:30. the presiding officer: the senate will come to order. the clerk will read a communication to the senate. the clerk: washington, d.c, december 24, 2012. to the senate: under the provisions of rule 1, paragraph 3, of the standing rules of the senate, i hereby appoint th
on the non-fiction selections. these titles were included in foreign policy magazines must read books to give in breakout nations in pursuit of the next economic miracles on the set is another author we want to introduce you to a and this is brian. here is his book castor's secrets the cia and the intelligence machine. if you could start by giving us your background, particularly your cia background. >> i worked at the national intelligence council in washington for about 45 years. i ultimately became the national intelligence officer for latin america which is a tree or four-star military equivalent but it's a pretty substantial position and i had the responsibility for all of latin america and cuba and the analytical side of intelligence. estimate what does that mean? >> i was not a field operative. i didn't go out and conduct espionage or meet foreign agents. i was basically most of my career at the headquarters in virginia i had the national intelligence estimates, quite a few on cuba over the years, and many of the other latin american countries. >> before we get into fidel castro and th
seem to be a foreign-policy, a policy foreign to the roast great deliberative body. >> to think of people who ran in 2010 and got elected with the people who ran before it ended now ascended to of leadership leave no with a solution or they were elected to not do things as opposed to do things? >> again, from the class of 2010 and now i refer to the 87 freshman, the so-called tea party class of the 112 congress, their belief is they are doing precisely what the people who elected them wish to do, which is rollback obama initiatives to cut spending. a lot of them thought the debt ceiling should not be increased under any circumstances and to that degree feel like i was. they basically believe their job is to obstruct barack obama and once there is a republican president in place from the two pass this initiative secreted better business climate, more and more deregulation committee funding of programs that have never quite been near and dear to them. of course to flash forward a day, i suspect we'll talk about the debt ceiling fiasco of 2011. after that summer undertaken to the b
think having programs that help manufacturers identify foreign markets and resources is critical. the third, i think you have to look at trade and tax policies. there is no doubt in my mind that china's policies are unfair, and not just to american workers. in my judgment, they are unfair to their own middle class. they are supporting elite exporters who have crony relationships with the regime at the expense of giving consumers access to the best products in the world, and we have to make economic fairness of the highest priority in our bilateral relationships with china, and then on tax policy, we have to look at how do we insent vise manufacturers with the right tax credits to invest in the united states? thank you. >> i wondered about obama's national export initiative, doubling them by 2014 if i'm correctly. >> i didn't plant the question. [laughter] >> so i was just wondering, first of all, what do we export? like, what would you say are the strengths where you export, and secondly, what do you think can be done by the government or other institutions in order to promote th
were included in "foreign policy" magazine's must read books.
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21